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of the kind of movement and institutional religion that it would become a few hundred years later-- we will miss the flavor of those earliest years of the kind of crude and rough beginnings, the... the small enclaves trying to keep the memory alive. >> we're hampered by our vocabulary.? we know that this group will eventually form a gentile community, and they'll be known as christians. but this group didn't think that. this group expected jesus to return and establish the kingdom of god. >> he is a jewish messiah. they are followers of a jewish apocalyptic tradition. they are expecting the coming of the kingdom of god on earth. it's a jewish movement. >> the jewish sect, then, is a group which sees itself as jews, recognizes that there are other jews out there, but claims that those other jews out there have it all wrong. they don't fully understand what judaism is all about, and only the members of the sect do. >> sectarian groups are always in tension with their environment. that tension is manifested in a tendency to want to spread the message out, to hit the road and convince othe
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
nihilism or atheism. the first amendment, congress shall make no law to establish religion or their free exercise thereof. in other words, stay out of it. obviously it assumes -- and there is god. we knew what the religions were. the baptist conventions, they weren't like worshiping a pope. they believed in god. i'm not going to revise history. i grew up in a religious environment and i'm proud of it. i am proud of it but i thank god i believe in god or i would probably be enormously angry right now. so they i am grateful and unapologetic. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable when we started talking a little bit about how the sub by this change over time and we could have could've also edit the 19th amendment, women becoming part of this ever greater ark of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. i will drink to that. [laughter] >> but that was repealed. in general most of the amendments, as you said before, maybe more perfect. >> or less perfect perk is. >> but then we got rid of it. >> i don't drink so i understand. [laughter] >> on revision is pretty extraordinary, the con
on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give her a chance. if she doesn't work out, there's a man in her class who will step in and take over for her. if y
. they should be able to train without having religion forced on them. joining me with reaction is executive director for the dr. ron cruise who is a retired army chaplain. good morning to you, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we see a situation in west point. one cadet who was an athiest felt uncomfortable with taking part in involuntary prayer, your reaction. >> it is a shame we don't respect the pluralism. can prayer in west point went back from the founding of our country and we need to respect the religious beliefs of all. those who believe and those who don'tment those who believe have every right to prayer and those who don't believe opt out of the prayer. we need to remember that our founding fathers, george washington upon his appointment as commander-in-chief in the army. one of his first acts was to ask congress to authorize chaplains in every brigade so that religious services could be held. prayer is fundament will in the lives of our soldiers from the beginning of our country and west point would do well to resist efforts by athleast advocates. >> i read a portion
invoked the god of many religions. leaders of the protestant, catholic, jewish, muslim and baha'i faiths offered prayers for the victims. there was no ignoring god right there on stage with president obama as he spoke at the vigil, delivering a speech that at times felt more like a sermon. >> for we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from god. an eternal house in heaven not built by human hands. let the little children come to me, jesus said, and do not hinder them for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven. may god bless and keep those we've lost in his heavenly place. >> it's not the first benediction from the president in the wake of a mass shooting. only this time, the profound sadness of the day happened at a time of year usually marked by happiness and celebration. the immeasurable loss in newtown was compounded by the image of gifts already bought, wrapped and tagged with the names of children who won't be there to open them on christmas morning. yet even as it seems that we're seeing god everywhere after what unfolded on friday at sandy hook
fundamentally, you know, it has a lot to do with morality and religion and the fact that the forces -- it has become more and more acceptable in our society to have children out of wedlock, in particular, in the african-american community. it is too bad. >> social science does show anything, it is the correlation between two parent families and achievement? >> absolutely. that was also politically incorrect to say for a long time. that is the reason one daniel patrick moynihan pointed out this problem in the 1960s come he got such a firestorm of criticism. his brave as he was come again nothing to do with this issue for the rest of his career. but now it is becoming increasingly recognized on both sides of the aisle. as roger said. you know, you name the social pathology, whether it's dropping out of school, getting into trouble with the law, whatever. there is a strong correlation between that and growing up in a home without a father, particularly for voice and this gentleman right here. >> we will have to job is to close in just a couple of minutes. this is our next last question. >> hello
wants him disqualified because of his religion. he is a member of the mormon church. i leave it to you to imagine what such a precedent could do to our entire system of justice if judges can be either assigned or disqualified on the basis of religion. these next few items may make you laugh, but you will hurt a little, too. a former california superintendent of education, dr max rafferty, has uncovered a few items having to do with extremes in the battle of the sexes. the department of health, education and welfare has discovered that in one public school system, more boys than girls were being spanked. if the school system doesn't want a million dollars in federal aid to be withheld, it will henceforth spank girls and boys in exactly equal numbers. in woonsocket, rhode island, the city council has ruled that from now on those metal-covered holes in our streets we've long called manholes will henceforth be known as person holes. and in missoula, montana, a peeping tom ordinance is now a 'peeping person' law. well, that's all the desk cleaning for today. and as i indicated when i began,
i fell out of love. that's your choice. >> he talks religion, reason, and what america needs now. >> the good life isn't good enough. what you need is the better life. >> the election, the economy, same-sex marriage and more, to the issues that really matter. >> you know why we have to change the constitution? it was a flawed document. it was made by men. >> what does god mean to you? this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening, and happy holidays and welcome to a special "piers morgan tonight." joining me, one of the most influential spiritual leaders in the world, rick warren. we're going to talk about politics, sins, and much, much more. he's the author of "a purpose driven life." >> it's good to be here with you. >> what is the purpose of christmas? >> you know, the angels in the story the first christmas said three things. those three statements say the three purposes of christmas. they are celebration, salvation, and reconciliation. first thing the angels said was, i bring you good news of great joy. which shall be for all people. by the way, christmas isn't just for ch
and more americans are shunning the idea of organized religion. so what does this mean for the future of america? we're going to be back in 60 seconds. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? share brotherly love. share one up's. mom ? mom ? the share everything plan. lets your family share a pool of data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. now get a lucid by lg, free. >> there is widespread suspicion of institutions, beginning in government and education, and it maybe it's not serving the needs of people like it used to. and we have to accept the responsibility for that. that is our fault. if they are getting bad preaching, bad liturgy, th
because that, religion is ruled out by the constitution. which is not right, but that's what they said. which led ted olsen -- a very prominent attorney -- to say that since nudity was preferred as prayer as a form of communication, perhaps the students ought to dance naked before the ball game. i thought that was all right unless, of course, they got naked by the dance of the seven veils which would bring the aclu down on their heads, because the dance of the seven veils refers, is found in the bible. >> host: something religion we get into. what, what have you seen in terms of the trend to have court over time, in terms of, you know -- >> guest: well, it's not just the court. that's one reason i say this book is not just for lawyers by any means. what we're talking about is the movement of the culture. we're talking about the movement of social classes within the culture. and that's reflected in the law. constitutional law isn't out there by itself doing these things. there are other forces in the society impinging upon it. now, i think it's probably true that throughout our history
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be unity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliame
a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. the
's religions. it affected most of the people that would be listening. we thought that was appropriate. >> they delayed a sighting that would delight children worldwide. >> there is a santa claus. >> a christmas celebration after he came back. >> ahead of time gave my wife a present the card said from the man on the moon. >> skwloefrd one up. >> apollo 8 showed everyone up. while they were beating the space race the end of the decade and jfk's deadline was quickly approaching. >> there was only one giant step left to make. left to make. it was make epic moments in [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis sympto. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving
's religions. it affected most of the people that would be listening. we thoughthat was appropriate. >> they delayed a sighting that would delight children worldwide. >> there is a santa claus. >> a christmas celebration after he came back. >> ahead of time gave my wife a present the card said from the man on the moon. >> skwloefrd one up. >> apollo 8 showed everyone up. while they were beating the space race the end of the decade and jfk's deadline was quickly approaching. >> there was only one giant step left to make. left to make. it was make epic moments in but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] a full life measured in seats starts with the righ
about it as a church and as a religion and also because brigham young is such a figure of broad significance in the 19th century america. >> and the most famous today's mitt romney. does the romney family have interaction with the brigham young plan? >> i'm sure there are many descendants that know each other. the church is still a fairly tight knit institution and especially in utah it means a lot if you have ancestors that go way back to the pioneer era of the church. >> romney does as well. >> why did the family in that in mexico at one part? >> wealthy ended up in mexico because i believe mitt romney's great grandfather practiced marriage, she was a polygamist and later a part in the 1800's case serious effort to incarcerate more men men who produce polygamy and they went to mexico to escape persecution and i'm not an expert on the family history, but i believe mitt romney's great grandfather was among them. >> the wait until he had died before the out of the polygamists? >> it was out what putative is essentially made a federal crime in 1862. but the u.s. government doesn't
baptist church as a hate group for targeting homosexuals, the military and other religions. it's now the single most supported petition ever on whitehouse.gov. >>> 4:39. toyota will pay more than $1 billion to settle a class action lawsuit over unintended acceleration in some of its vehicles. the settlement is one of the largest of its type in automotive history. drivers sued toyota because floor mats were stuck causing the vehicle to accelerate. under the agreement toyota will install a brake override system and other special safety features on more than three million cars. >> for consumers it means that two major defects in toyota vehicles are going to get fixed. so the bad news, well, how many more defects are there? how many more recalls are there going to be? i mean, after all, toyota in the last three years has recalled over 10 million vehicles. >> if it's approved by a federal judge, toyota will make cash payments to owners who sold their cars at a reduced price due to the bad publicity. the settlement, however, does not resolve claims by people who want money for injuries or
york democrat carolyn maloney and our own eleanor holmes norton to storm out in protest. >> religion does not trip the right. you try to find an accommodation when you have two rights crashing. the reproductive rights of women and the religious rights of religious institution >> angry for being silenced house democratic leaders held their own hearing on contraception coverage. the hearing featured one witness. sandra fluke was a law student at georgetown university. she had lobbied her school to include contraception coverage for students in its health insurance policy. fluke's testimony earned her a prime spot on the podium at the democratic convention. she was one of many women highlighted at both the democratic and republican conventions. >> it's an exciting time to be a woman. and i want to go out there and celebrate it. and continue to see what women can do in this country. >> while jobs and the economy continued to be issue number one, the prickly issue of abortion and contraceptive rights detonated time and again. richard mourdock, the gop senate candidate in indiana talked ab
of gun ownership called for mental health care as a way to protect schools. >>> religion leaders prayed for peace and called for action to prevent gun violence. church members held sunday service then a town hall forum to answer questions and spark discussion. actor and activist danny glover and jeremiah wright. glover says the connecticut shooting has brought a problem dealt with daily, gun violence. >> daily in light of what has happened in newtown connecticut, don't you give up on me. because now it is time for you to act. >> a group of san francisco faith leaders met with leaders to discuss what they can do to help. they hope to have similar meetings in the months to come. >>> the key to solving bay area traffic problems could come from cell phone towers. a uc berkeley team says their study is the first that data from cell phone towers and gps devices have been used to track traffic and their research could be used to can cut down your drive time. stop and go traffic and break lights are part of life here. now researchers from uc berkeley have released a study that could ease traffi
a presidential presence in multi religion prayer vigil in chicago perhaps as well a speech by the present to the nation. and please don't misunderstand me. i applaud the president's sense of words and the time he shared with the families of the citizens of the town yesterday to my but he would also urge reflexion and consideration of the facts when we now them and take into account the fact that we do know. chicago right now is the murder capital of this country. those killings in chicago have risen to 20 percent of the past year. up 20%. despite the lmost always on mentioned fact that chicago has one of the toughest gun-control laws of almost any city in this country. the president called for change and change is underway. a federal appellate court tossed out the state of illinois ban of concealed weapons. the last state to deny that right to its citizens. compared illinois to states that permit concealed carry like virginia and in the five-year time guarantee does is extends to those mullen, two dozen sex- 2011, a lot of facts in this, but there are facts that we need to assemble and ex
francisco city attorney looked into this, the city's aligning with a religion, should they distance themselves on that grounds? >> thank you. are there other members of the public who wish to speak on this item, item number 5? seeing none, public comment is closed. do we have a motion? >> so moved. >> we have a motion to send this item forward with recommendation and we can do that without objection. thank you. item 6. >> item number 6, resolution establishing the appropriations limit for fy 2012-2013 pursuant to california constitution article xiii b. >> thank you very much for this item from the controller's office. we have [speaker not understood]. >> thank you, members of the committee. neil levinson, [speaker not understood] from the controller's office. i'll be very brief and happy to answer questions. this resolution before you is required by the california constitution and government code. each year the city needs to confirm its appropriations limit under the gan provisions. in this calculation we have done, it reflects through calculations allowed by the state code that we
take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into
civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,000 feet and we were
they have daily and meaningful contact with a person of another race or religion. and then i had another trial after this was done in another jurisdiction that shall go unnamed, and i would say there were maybe 5 percent of the jurors, potential jurors, who had had meaningful contact with a person of a different race or ethnicity and that's really what this is about. one of my least favorite words is the word tolerance because, you know, i tolerate brussel sprouts but if you simply tolerate the diversity that is america, you are going to, you are aspiring for mediocrity. when we have, and this gets back to your question, when we have leaders that embrace diversity and that build a culture that says, you know what, if you want to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company,
and other religions. >>> things don't look good for a new york city while found on a beach. it's the second largest species of whale is alive and appears to be injured. police have been playing water on -- spraying water on it so it can breathe. they don't expect it to survive much longer. they may have to euthanize it in what would be called a humane death. this is the second largest species of whale on the new york city beach. >>> here's a story about paying it forward twice. an iowa woman won $30,000 last year in the lottery a week before christmas. michelle bristol spent a gad chunk of the money helping other people. she helped pay off several layaway accounts and paid for gifts for three families in need. well, her good deeds touched a dental care company. they decided to give bristol a beautiful smile at no charge. >> she gave away so much money and you just don't see that very often. it's very inspiring and it really made all of us want to do whatever we could to give her something very special and kind of pay it for ward. >> her husband encouraged her go ahead get the dental work do
. according to tradition. as religion correspondent lauren green reports some scholars have a different take. ♪ ♪ >> christians from every background acknowledge bethlehem the birthplace of jesus. >> why call it jesus of nazareth? >> it was based on the earlier tradition that jesus had born there. >> we visited the church of the nativity built by the emperor constantine in iv century. >> why go to a cave to have a baby? well, luke tells us they laid him in a manger because there was no room in the inn. greek word is cataloma and that the guest house is full no, privacy. rather than give birth if guest room they take hor to the cave where things are quiet. >> many scholars believe jesus was born in nazareth. >> can anything good come from nazareth? jesus is from nazareth. the statement can anything good come from nazareth assumes he's from nazareth. >> that didn't make sense. they remind the readership he was born in bethlehem. >> book of luke says in the pregnancy, mary and joseph travelled to bethlehem to register for roman census. and angel reassured joseph he should take mary as his w
: watters, what an assignment. more and more americans are shunning the idea of organized religion. so what does this mean for the future of america? we're going to be back in 60 seconds. >> announcer: stop! living with hair loss, that is. losing your hair is no fun and no one wants to be bald, but there is hope. >> getting my hair back was the best thing that ever happened to me. >> i'm happy with the way i look now. >> i'm very excited about my hair. >> i feel beautiful. >> i love my hair. >> announcer: hair club offers all-proven hair loss solutions backed by our commitment to satisfaction guaranteed. if you're not 100% satisfied with the solution you choose, hair club will apply the purchase price to another proven hair loss solution or transplant more hair at no charge. >> and that was the best thing i've ever done. >> it looks good on me. >> announcer: call in the next five minutes to get your free brochure at no obligation. it will tell you everything you need to know about your hair loss problem, and it's free if you call now. >> i am more pleased than what i had even imagined. >> i
testament is the basis of many religions and it affected most of people listening to us so we thought that was very appropriate. >> he relayed a citing that delighted children. >> lebanese -- please be informed there is a santa claus. >> it delays the christmas celebration. >> partly delayed but i planned ahead of time and gave my wife a present that said "from the man in the moon." >> apollo eight showed everyone up, certainly the soviets, but while america was now leading the space race, the john f. kennedy deadline was quickly approaching. >> there was only one giant step left to take on the pathway to the moon and it would be an epic moment in human history. n. staying active can actually ease arthritis sympto. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be
will on the history of religion and politics which and then james taylor monday night on c-span. >> hawaii senator daniel inouye i'd monday at the age of 88. he served for than 33 years as senator. a memorial service was held friday with president obama among the speakers and his funeral will be tomorrow in hawaii. his colleagues paid him tribute on the senate floor tuesday. this is about an hour. >> mr. president, i would just first say that my friend chairman of the ju dish yare committee has been honored to receive one of the senate's highest honors of the senate and icon grat late him on. that and i join with him in expressing my sadness over the passing of senator daniel inouye. he came to this government 60 years ago in the legislature hawaii. he came to congress when hawaii became a state in 1959, to the snalt in 63, second nonl service to robertbird. this is a seers man, a solid man, a patriot and one who always had a good spirit about whow he conducted his affairs and how rerelated to other members of the senate and to his constituents and to the american people. he served in the most vio
the two populations to in congress so different in race, language, religion, and law could be blended together in one harmonious math? after this sort of rousing speech play called for mass meetings around the country to end the war. and people actually took him up on it. i located over 30 meetings in support of his anti-war resolution from indiana to the jersey and louisville to maine. this geographic scope of people who basically are meeting together in public forums and saying, we need to leave mexico and end this war immediately. it's well beyond the opposition of the war of 1812 and constitutes the first national grassroots anti-war movement in american history. i should tell you. what clay asked to have happen was for the united states to leave mexico and not take any territory from mexico altogether . he won a piece without territory which, of course, did not happen. just two weeks after clay's speech, the 30th congress convened in washington and guess who was there? iran led. he heard plays speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to was
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
but he basically made up his own religion and this really weird book called something like the secret history of the universe as revealed through occult science in detroit, michigan. i almost used that for my title. he ended up he and his entire family were brutally gruesomely murdered. they were be headed, his children were killed as well, and it was a big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and find all this coverage and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living so i walked over to check it out and where his house was, so i filed that way and we're the enough, probably a year later there was another murder almost literally across the street. it was a drug thing and these kids were trying to -- their ridge two rival drug houses, they were trying -- these two teenagers were trying to scare off radicals and to do this they ended up killing and then dismembering this guy and scattering body parts around literally across the street from this other murder. again, that was history repeating itself in a wa
-government. religion didn't tolerate it in political culture and family culture does not tolerate it. this is a lost cause. we must not involve ourselves. so he would not involve less in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, political history or religious history of self-government. they don't know what it means. >> and what would you like? >> i'm not quite sure what he was late. >> even federalists would be appalled at the federal government intrusion in our lives today. it is in every area of our lives. veterans commit the troops bedrooms, living rooms, garages, rose, everywhere the federal government is in our lives and that would have appalled the most extreme federalists who founded this type of government. the first thing he would done, patrick and i would have gone right along with him. they would've gone in your bedroom and threats of attack that tag for the mattress. >> will entertain questions for the audience. they urge you in homage brian lamb, founder of c-span who tuning asks the best questions, which are simple and direct, we
and as a young teenager i read the entire bible. the language, leaving aside all talk of religion and focusing on the words that are used in the king james translation, first of all, it is fabulously well written and secondly, so many of those phrasess and rhythms have entered into all of our minds, all of us whether we have ever read the bible or not we know those frayss and we used them and i think i am probably every other riders in the english language has been influenced by the king james translation more than by any of the book. what i'd like to do when i come to manhattan, actually the same as what i do in london. i like to go to restaurants with my friends. >> i read the -- "eye of the needle" and on the wings of eagles and i thought they were both superb. your comment about boy george and communism put something in my mind. have you come across any similar conversations between franco and hitler as to why franco did not declare war on the allies after having accepted so much aid from the not seize and if so could you put me in that direction? >> i have never come across such a convers
religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have
men and women of faith, but today, religion is very politicized. can you talk about that? >> faith, this belief, this sense that somehow and some way we will overcome, this belief that, in spite of all the odds setbacks, delays come interruptions, that we will make it, that we will arrive at a place where we recognize and respect and dignity and the work of every human being. it is the keeping with the philosophy and the discipline of nonviolence to believe that we will and we shall overcome, that we will not get lost in a sea of despair, that we will not become bitter or hostile, but with our faith, and we know the victory is there. it may take longer, it may be difficult, but you come to that point where there is no turning back without that sense of faith, we would not be where we are today. people ask me all the time what you did not give up, why you did not turn backed, why you did not fight back. my faith kept me going, kept me grounded, kept me anchored. >> president obama will be giving his renomination address at the democratic convention in the bank of america stadium. i
claims that are baseless. what concerns me about morsi is they wrap themselves around in religion and i'm a muslim and they do not own islam. and what concerns me about this particular constitution is that it was written hurriedly but old ultra conservative men. and women who work with the brotherhood have internalized their own subjugation. >> i appreciate your time. coming up, will armed guards and police officers in schools nationwide become a reality? hey sis, it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the clear choice. okay, i'm outta here. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office sup
children were not killed in sandy hook based upon their ethnicity or their religion or their politics. it was human beings shot by madness. and the combination of a mental depression and that of posttraumatic syndrome, even put politics in chicago, for example, 49% people this year. 75% under the age of 18. so we look at 27, which was such a gross situation there in sandy hook, but in chicago, that's why at some point the president would come and speak in chicago and right here in inglewood because he is not just about mental illness. it's also about politics of war, drug war, guns, and drugs in and jobs out. we have a very different warfare scene than in a place like this. >> what would you do to protect school children right now? >> i think, first, the ban on assault weapons is a step in the right direction. secondly, stop gun trafficking across state lines, second thing. the third thing is you must -- we have more police patrols around schools in chicago, in inglewood, for example. shootings are down because more police patrol. but these are official police patrolling as opposed to
rifle and body armor? steve siebold is the author of the book "sex, politics, and religion ,"and david corn is the washington bureau chief for "mother jones" magazine. mr. siebold, are you comfortable with what the nra put forward today? >> well, absolutely. i mean, this is the only answer. that more guns equals less crime. i mean, if we don't arm the teachers, if we don't have guards at the schools, this is going to happen again. there's no question about it, whether we do this or not. but at least the teachers have a fighting chance. at least they have a fighting chance to save those little kids. >> do i understand your view to be that it would be a requirement for teachers? what if i'm a teacher who doesn't want to carry a firearm? i'm not proficient and i want nothing to do with guns. >> i don't want my kid in your class, then. because my kid is in danger -- >> wow? real? >> i'll send my kid to another school. >> so to a young person today who's pursuing a career in education, they would also need to be trained and comfortedble with the idea of carrying a weapon? >> unfortunately,
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
of religion, says it only applies to certain entities. it doesn't. and the idea that congress here, through the president's plan, has burdened the religious exercise of hobby lobby to the point where they're being compelled to violate their conscience, i can't imagine the founders would have thought that to be a very good idea. again, i go back to the basic point. all they had to do was keep a status quo here. >> kelly: that's a very good point here 'cause they're facing a million dollars in fines every day and they provide a lot of employment. what happens to a company like this because they're standing on their faith principles? >> eric: it's a tough call. it's like chick-fil-a, the same thing. the difference with that is that people came and said we're going to support chick-fil-a. they got that support. this is a big one because if hobby lobby wins this, they probably already lost it, but if they somehow prevail in the courts, there are a lot of faith-based companies, founders of companies that would like to do the same. the question is, will there be anyone else besides churches and re
in our nation's military without having religion forced upon them. academy officials must respect the religious liberty rights of all cadets who should be free to make their own decisions about prayer without government could ercion. >> what is your reaction to their complaint? >> they've attacked the military several times and an anti-christian organization. that has been their pattern. secondly, there is no coercion, but what mr. lynn is trying to do is attack the last bastion of traditional american values and many of those values came out of christianity and the whole idea of prayer within the military as a whole, but west point specifically, i think, is something that mr. lynn wants to destroy that tradition because of the influence of christianity in our military, as well as in our society. >> dave: is religion ever forced on cadets at west point? >> absolutely not, nor anywhere else in the military. and if mr. lynn would spend the time to understand the first amendment and the -- how the first amendment was written, what it was intended to do, it was actually intended to pr
marrow school, from kindergarten right up through the sixth grade. every morning, no matter what religion you were, every morning you put your head down on the desk and you said the lord's prayer, which was regarded as nondenominational. now, today you can't do that. my question to you is without faith in the classroom and they're impressionable kids, they don't know the difference between right and wrong in many cases. whether that would have stopped this crazy guy in newtown, i don't know, but it seems to me faith in schools, particularly for these young kids should be restored in some way. >> well, i'm a catholic and i was raised in a pretty strong faith environment with my family. and i certainly had this at my school. and i don't disagree with you. i think it's all sorts of things, larry. it's the lack of parental guidance, as well. i think it's the breakdown of the social fabric of the family in america and many other countries. but the particular problem for america, which no other country that has the video -- britain has mental health issues, britain has the same videos, the same
," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright recounts her childhood in czechoslovakia during the nazi invasion in "prague winter." in bill veeck, paul dickson details the life of the advocate for racial equality and players' economic rights. damien ec cols in "life after death." for an extended links of various publications' 2012 notable book
to the abolitionists, and so their attitude was you want us to study your language and religion, we'll do it, but at the same time, we're going to invest on our own io deppedty as the mendi people. you could say that their african identity grew as a counterpoint to the idea that they should be civilized pie yous christians. now, all of these tensions were on displace because once the supreme court ruled in their favor and said they could go home, well, the supreme court said they had to have speedometer to pay for the going home, how were they going to get home? well, for the longest time, people believed louis and other wealthy abolitionists paid for this, but, in fact, what happened, the abolitionists with the cooperation of the africans organized a big tour up and down the eastern sea board in which the africans would go and speak and perform their knowledge of christianity, perform their knowledge of english, perform their civilization, and, at the same time, insisted on singing their native african songs, the african side was always there, and here's the wildest part of it all -- the ma
. hamilton responded by saying jefferson was a fanatic in politics and an atheist in religion, and anonymous letter writer once wrote: i think you ought to get a damn kicking, you redheaded son of a bitch. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these battles for a long time. so jefferson himself saw that we were always going to be divided. he said that men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interests of the many or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my famil
that america is freedom. freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of enterprise, and freedom is special and rare. it's fragile. it needs production. so we've got teach history based not on what is in fashion, but what is important. why the pilgrims who came here. who jimmy doolittle was and what the 30 seconds over tokyo met. on the 40th anniversary of d day i read a letter from a woman who wrote to her father who fought over d.day. she said we will always remember and never forget what the boys of normandy did. let's help her keep her word. i'm worning of an eradication of the american memory that could result ultimately in the erosion of the american spirit. let's start with basics. more attention to american history and greater emphasis on sitting ruche l. let me offer lesson one. all great change in america begins at the dinner table. tomorrow night in the kitchen i hope the talk begins and children, if your parents haven't been teaching you what it means to be an american, let them know and nail them on it. that would be a very american thing to do. [applause] i want to thank staff
free speech rights in the first amendment. why wouldn't they have the free exercise of religion rights that are also in fact, they start the first amendment as the religious -- i think it's a very important point to make that though hobby lobby has had a tough time taking this to get the preliminary injunction, nothing has been decided on the merits. we actually just won yesterday in 7th court of appeals. our client. corporation. not a religious organization. a regular company. they got the injunction, we have done that for two other of our clients we're 3 for 3. the judges matter in this situation who you get before you this is important precedent. how many companies might have an objection to providing the morning after pill. what justice society to my your said they are not religious organizations. how do you get around that burden? >> i think you get around the burden by saying forever legal purposes this is not a fun term for people and it's true. this is how the law works. when you look at the law really holding here it's the first amendment. really the religious freedom restorat
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
, no matter your ethnic group, religion or sexual orientation. that's what we fought for in 2012. and that's what we're determined to keep the fight on in 2013. i'll be there and i hope you're there with us. as we go forward. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. please join us monday, new year's eve, at 6:00 p.m. for the second annual revvie awards. on behalf of everyone here at politics nation, have a safe and h happy new year. "hardball" starts right now. >> deal or no deal. let's play ""hardball." >> good evening. i'm richard wolf in for chris matthews. at the 11th hour, just when people were starting to lose hope, the president met with congressional leaders this afternoon and declared he was modestly optimistic about a deal on taxes. speaking in the white house briefing room, president obama condemned congress for failing to resolve its differences in any normal way. >> christin, let's take a listen to what the president said about the up or down vote about what he expects to emerge from the senate. >> i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with senate
of religion. they are inalienable and it is unfathomable to us that there are parts of the world where they don't believe that. it's amazing, but true. how far do we go in pushing what we believe to be universal rights when we know we're going to get some kind of negative reaction? i mean, can we be tough or russia because they're less important to us than say, china or saudi arabia? >> i think the russians would like us to be tougher. what is quite interesting is that vladimir putin might have stepped out too far on this issue. there are 600,000 orphans in russia right now which is more than they had during the time of world war ii. now, oftentimes the russians and russian public opinion can be quite anti-american except in this case almost 40% of russians actually support the act which when you consider it it's not a majority, but coming from a country that's often anti-american and public opinion that's really significant. >> when putin was signing the thing he said, so what if the living standards in other countries are better than ours? so what? i don't care. should we all move th
billion times or more. and guess what? towns and cities and civilizations and cultures and religion and science in the words that we are using communicate with you. propulsion and repetition, persistence and obsessive and driven repetition. the simple rule is an assumption. but the assumptions of health and scientists. but unlike many functions, the termite one wraps around and there is something more antibiotic about it. in fact, they are holding onto a reality that does not exist until the termite makes it. no single termite can make this. the reality that only tens of thousands of termite can make. it is a rule that makes laws were there were no walls and towers were there were no towers and on the very forefront of your brain, they put into world that wasn't there. a world of what could be. a world of possibility. it is an axiom. remember those 165 words i recall it's? those were axioms. and those have strange powers. of how and why. the power of the termite. here comes the problem number three. it is a mystery hidden in plain sight. hidden in one of science's favorite fixations
of the values we hold. it is not just our dna. it is our values. be our nation not defined by blood or religion but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you
is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are other issues were important we are facing which need to be addressed. please do
to get out of christmas with the "-in-laws. >> there actually was a survey, the public religion research institute found 2% of americans said they believed the world would end based on a prediction by the mayans but nasa explains the mayans did not actually predict that. >> none of the thousands of ruins, tablets and standing stone that archaeologists have examined foretell an end of the world. >> this was a misinterpretation nasa says of the way the mayan calendar. nasa has cool animation to explain. it looks like an odometer from a car. the way the odometer resets to zero, the calendar was to reset on or around december 21st, 2012 based on what the days were. so the world wasn't going to go anywhere even according to the mayans. and there would have been a new calendar at that point. this is just one of many apocalyptic scenarios nasa has had to fight off. some people believe a planet has been on a collision course with earth. nasa says that's not the case. there's this very cool video called a gam malray burst when a star collapses and creates this black hole and in that process incre
. >> it is a stable situation because my, what the obama administration's argument basically says, religion is entirely private matter. you're allowed to have your private little ritual in head inch a way rooms and synagogues and mosque but the second it enters the public square it has to be bent and contorted to fit whatever the government says it should do. so the, the obama administration doesn't talk about freedom of religion. it talks about freedom of worship which is distinction they think it is very important. it means you are allowed to do whatever you want religiously in private, but the second it touches the government square the government wins over religious conscience. >> what strikes me, and we've done this story before, the folks at hobby lobby are not just using this to avoid something. they appear to be incredibly sincere in their religious beliefs. >> yeah. i mean, there is no profit motive in here that i think is really meaningful. this is the biggest company so far to question the hhs mandate and, you know, i think people would understand it more viscerally if we were ta
of culture, race or religion or tribe there is some commonality. these are essential human truths and passions and truth and moral precepts. >> guest: in some ways that is a variation of what he said in a speech that made him famous in 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston where he said there are no red states or. states that the united states. that prevented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far he could take that. he has been dealing with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since as i am sure we will both be experiencing when the telephone calls come for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story". you say there's another volume coming. >> guest: 40 years of robert caro who is one of my heroes, check that out on the down load. i have every intention -- i have a lot of reporting which influenced this first book even though they are not in it. i don't want to do quickie, i don't want my books -- i write them for history. there are a lot of docume
made sense is regardless of culture and race and religion, there is some commonality. the essential human truths and passions and hopes and moral precepts that are universal. >> guest: that is part of the speech that made him famous. the united states, not just red states and blue states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. the presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he could deal with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since. as i'm sure we would both be experiencing in the telephone calls. >> host: so your book ends in 1989. he said there is another common? >> guest: i didn't want to get too ahead of myself, but i have every intention. i've done a lot of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for
themselves a religious organization. all they are doing is using religion as a false front. this is a criminal organization. they make their money by smuggling and kidnapping and through intimidation. there our family names of gangs. they have no real political motives that are good for any country. let alone a country so suffering is afghanistan. these people should not be allowed back to the government. but i am afraid because of the weak position that we have and the karzai government, everyone is saying that we need a political settlement. most wars, all wars end with completely defeated enemies or a negotiated position. in this case, it's going to be a negotiated position because we cannot defeat it. we just don't have the forces nor the political will to do so. harris: captain nash, thank you for your perspective today. >> my pleasure. jon: new york city is the safest big city in america. fewer workers per population than any other big town. the murder strikes again here is a man is pushed to his death in front of a subway train for the second time this month. the sea
refer to religion things in code and jesus was the partridge in a pear tree. >> bill: i was supposed to know that? what an uplifting christmas question when henry the eighth was beheading all the catholics they thought jesus was a bird so they could live. and a merry christmas to you, doocy. >> thanks very much. >> bill o'reilly, thank you very much. >> any time. >> steve: for gracing us with your wisdom. >> brian: that is so fantastic. >> gretchen: so great he wasn't out of character. >> merry christmas. >> brian: same character in the hallway or office. >> steve: usually at 9:00 eastern time. ali over to you. >> alisyn: voices of rise into the heavens these teenagers are keeping the tradition of gospel music alive. we are joined gospel for teens and program director. it's great to have all of you here today. >> thank you. >> alisyn: thanks so much for being with us. >> it's so exciting. >> alisyn: wait until everyone hears your beautiful voices we will get to that in a second. i want to talk to you about the program. you stated that the goal is to bring gospel into the lives of kid
some of the core conservative groups. one question and the together was whether his religion might be an issue for evangelical voters. we know even jokers -- evangelicals have a little bit of discomfort in the faith and what it is. we did some polling last november that suggested that while they may have some misgivings about the mormon faith, it was not going to be enough to sway them from voting for obama. and the level of enthusiasm was relatively strong, even all the way into the final weeks of the campaign. it was not a lot of evidence that was a problem for them. i think the broader concern at related to the primaries and it from these past experience was that he had a favorability problem. he just was not an appealing candidates. not in terms of firing up the ideological base but appealing to the average american. by august his favorability ratings were still deeply negative territory. he had 37 percent of voters viewing him favorably. that is a -15 margin. we have never seen a presidential candidates be that- that late in an election cycle. you could go through the previous
there needs to be more recognition of the unique cultural aspects, religion, culture, language. >> would use the the little bit to the american attitude of the chinese -- would you speak a little bit about the american attitude toward chinese investment in the united states? >> if you're asking me about the american viewpoint, you all represent that. if you ask me about the american government viewpoint, the administration welcomes foreign investment from all countries into the united states, including from china. obviously, there are certain issues of national security that have to be looked at, whether the investment comes from france, and germany, israel or china. there is a committee on foreign investment in the united states. out of the hundreds of billions of dollars a year of direct investment coming into the united states involving thousands of transactions, only about 100 per year are reviewed by the united states government, and only about six or seven of those involved chinese companies. and out of the hundred that the united states reviews, only about 6%-7% are ever modified. so,
laws, or is it the view that you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we look at these cases and resolve them according to our best view of the law not in terms of a political or conservative agenda. now, there are ways of characterizing us that make a little bit more sense in terms of the work we do. some of my colleagues refer to it here fairly strictly to the text of the statute. others of my colleagues like to look more expansively to what we call the legislative history, the background of the statute or its purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of us think it's very important be what the framers -- what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it, others of us on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. again, those sorts of things make sense. it's just easer isier, i -- easier, i think, for reporters to say that justice is liberal, and that justice is conservative, and
of the three, main religions. >> reporter: it's so politically charged. >> so politically charged. >> reporter: discovered by accident in the 19th century, when an archaeologist was walking his dog. this massive network of caves and tunnels is known as solomon's quarry. king solomon is the founding father of the free masons. >> reporter: the reminder of solomon, his temple and his construction, seems to seep from these walls. tears of the king. >> the tears of the king. >> reporter: why is he crying? >> well, this was the end of the first temple period. >> reporter: it was under zedekiah rule that jerusalem fell to the babylonians. the temple was destroyed. and the ark of the covenant went missing from both history and the pages of the bible. >> the last time anybody really sees it, according to the biblical tradition. >> reporter: many believe these underground tunnels were used to secretly transport the ark out of jerusalem. and when the babylonian troops took inventory of the treasures they had plundered, something was missing. >> there are other stories that maybe someone spirited the ark
to a community and to sing with all different religions and all different types of music. it's really good. ♪ >> even if you speak different lanks -- lanks, lank -- languages. >> and their friends come, too. it's an opportunity to see our cathedral. >> it's amazing. >> the first time i saw it, it was just incredible. it's very ornate and decorative. >> i constantly get the feedback from people that say how much they appreciate it and that 2 really -- it's -- it's become a tradition. it gets their season started. it's a gift. it's a gift to give back. >> i always get a little emotional. i get choked up and i just see that it is -- i'm pleased it's still continued sort of in his spirit. there's something magical about playing at christmas concerts. >> i think it's good to listen to that and hear that. >> it's awesome to get the holiday season with songs. >> you can see this story and more from our photojournalist on our special that airs tomorrow right near at noon and 5:30. you can watch it at 7:30 on kicu tv36. >>> california saved nearly $250 million by requiring state lawmakers to driv
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